WHAT IS CARIBBEAN CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY?/¿QUÉ ES LA TEOLOGÍA CRISTIANA CARIBEÑA?

BY JULIANY GONZÁLEZ NIEVES

While we have just begun our series featuring women from the Southern Hemisphere, we want to include this special contribution from a contributor who has been working on this piece since our last series. Further, this post highlights underrepresented voices that need to be heard across the divinity disciplines, regardless of geography.

ENGLISH VERSION

Introduction

The Caribbean has rarely been considered a producer of knowledge, particularly as it regards to theology. Its theological elaborations have yet to receive the attention that other so-called contextual theologies have. However, this does not mean that theological reflection in word and praxis has been absent in the region. In fact, history bears witness to how the Caribbean continues to journey from theologies of imposition and imitation to theologies of indigenization, even though the process has been truncated by different factors.

A multilingual, geographically fragmented, and insular region, the Caribbean reality as we know it emerged from processes of imperial and colonial exploitation in its most brutal forms. These included the genocide of its native populations and the importation of African people through the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade in the colonial matrix of competing European powers. So, to talk about the Caribbean and its people is to talk about the erasure, imposition, and re-making of identity in the context of colonialism in its old and new ways, which have lasted well into the 21st century. It is to talk about the social, cultural, political, psychological, religious and economic legacy left by both the colonial enterprise and the theologies of domination that baptized the latter as [g]od’s will. These are the realities that serve not just as a backdrop against which theological articulations are formed but as the very starting point of our theologizing.

This essay does not want to be presumptuous. We cannot condense the expansiveness and complexity of the Caribbean and its rich plurality in a blog post or even a book. The aim of this brief piece is to serve as a conversation-starter for those who might have never heard or are not familiar with Caribbean Christian theology, its priorities, sources, features, and voices.

Main Priorities of the Caribbean

In his essay “Caribbean Theology: The Challenge of the Twenty-First Century,” Adolfo Ham delineates five main Caribbean priorities. These are decolonization, identity, integration, development, and education.[1]

  • Decolonization

Colonialism and neo-colonialism –the “economic, social and political control by outside forces, yet often through the agency of inside privilege classes”[2]– is the common denominator in the Caribbean context. It is the determining factor that shapes all aspects of life and self at both collective and individual levels. In the region, decolonization requires more than mere political independence. For as Agustina Luvis Núñez argues, “Decolonization has to go as deep as colonization has. There needs to be a conversion of the heart, a reorientation of the mind, a re-evaluation of values, a deconstruction of oppressive structures, and a construction of proper structures.”[3]

  • Identity

The issue of identity is complex given its individual, national, and regional layers, and how these have been formed, deformed, and reformed in the context of imperial imposition and domination. The Caribbean identity was birthed from the extermination of its indigenous populations, the kidnapping and importation of enslaved Africans, the migration of other people groups, and the formation of colonial subjects and their consciousness “in the shadow of empire.”[4] Garnett Roper is worth citing at length here,

Along with being valued only for their imitative capability, people living in the shadow of empire are often invisible. Their existence is not sharp or clear-cut and they do not have a properly defined identity. They have no real human face or substance. They are therefore open to being stamped with the stereotypical economic and ethnic images chosen by imperial interests. Matters of geographical size, ethnic/demographic composition, economic prosperity, and strategic location are attributed to whole nations and people as their only significance […] They have no acknowledged identity, save that which is conveniently assigned to them; their importance or lack of importance is determined by their value in relation to imperial interests.[5]

Roper argues this has led the Caribbean people to a “perpetual identity crisis,” against which Caribbean theology raises its voice “in protest against, and in response to.”[6]

  • Integration

As Ham notes, the struggle for independence in the Caribbean was always envisioned by our ancestors in the framework of a united region which modeled fair inter-dependence.[7] This integration will honor the particularities of each nation’s identity while striving to cultivate a regional identity.

  • Development

Quality of life has been something elusive to the majority of our population in the Caribbean. A lot of the development that at some point or another has been pursued has failed to be sustainable at multiple levels, putting some of our nations into further economic vulnerability. This is what in Latin America has been called desarrollismo –socio-economic development proposals that do not attack the root problems and protect the interests of world powers.[8] For Kathy McAfee, the type of development needed in the Caribbean is one that “redefines growth; is ecologically, psychologically and socially sustainable; allows women to play a central role; rescues Caribbean culture and identity; and empowers the region’s poor majority.”[9] It is un desarrollo integral –a holistic development.

  • Education

Education is the last area identified by Ham as one of the main Caribbean priorities. He describes it as “one of the crisis areas.”[10] The present status of education in the Caribbean varies from nation to nation. For instance, in Puerto Rico, we have a crisis at the K-12 level, particularly due to the corrupt government and the stealing of funds supposed to support our public schools. Yet simultaneously, we are seeing the most academically trained generation of young professionals underemployed due to the socio-economic reality of the archipelago. So, it is common to see people who have earned master’s and doctoral degrees working in service positions, which do not require that kind of training. Ham notes that this priority is directly related to theological education, which from my perspective is in an incredibly critical state in the region due to various reasons, including lack of funds, the lack of fairly-paid opportunities for those theologically trained, and the ill administration of some seminaries.

To these priorities, Ashley Smith rightly adds family and gender relationships, which is of vital importance in a region where gender-based violence is pervasive and on the rise in a context of impunity.

It comes as no surprise that these priorities play a central role in any Christian theological elaboration that aspires to be considered “Caribbean.” For as Gutiérrez writes, “[Theology] deals with a faith that is inseparable from the concrete conditions in which [… people] live.”[11] To do theology in the region divorced from the realities that mark it and the history that formed it is sterile and infructuous. Furthermore, the goal of Christian theologizing is not simply the articulation of statements but transformational praxis rooted in the Gospel of the God of Life and his Kingdom – A kingdom that stands in stark contrast to the colonial anti-kingdoms that have shaped life in the Caribbean; a God that affirms the dignity and identities of the Caribbean people; and a Gospel that is good news for life in this life and not only for life after death. Decolonization, formation and reclamation of identity, integration, holistic development, and education are key elements for the flourishing of the nations that constitute this region. For Caribbean theology to dismiss these priorities is to dismiss the promise and possibility of human flourishing for its people.

The Sources of Caribbean Christian Theology

Emmette Weir identifies four main sources of Caribbean Christian theology. These are the biblical text, the history of the Caribbean people, the history of the Church in the Caribbean, and statements of conciliar and ecumenical bodies in the Caribbean.[12] I believe there is congruency between these and some elements of the “Wesleyan Quadrilateral.” For instance, both give Scripture the preeminent place as source for theological reflection. Additionally, Caribbean theology maintains the tradition and experience elements in the form of contextual history and conciliar and ecumenical theological formulations by the Caribbean church. This history, although particular, is not disjoined from the catholic Church’s history. For Christian Caribbean theologians, the sources question is not a case of either/or but one of both/and, in which they have the opportunity of doing theology under the shadow of the catholic Church and in light of their context.

The Project of Caribbean Christian Theology

For Roper, Caribbean theology “has been wedded to the historical project” of the Caribbean, whose “concern [is] not just liberation from oppression, but a commitment to the survival of a people.”[13] He elaborates, “In this regard, Caribbean theology seeks to approximate the reign of God, the eschatological ideal of shalom, in the concrete situation of the Caribbean.”[14] Thus, the project of Caribbean Christian theology is transformation. That is, transformation of the structures that perpetuate the life-depriving and self-serving reigns of the anti-kingdoms of this world at personal, national, and regional levels. This transformation is made possible by a theologizing that lives out in word and praxis the shalom-seeking values of the Kingdom of God, and is rooted in a gospel that is good news not only for life after death but for life in this life.

What Is Caribbean Christian Theology?

Given the plurality and complexity of the region, is it even possible to answer this question? Who gets to define it? Furthermore, which definition of Caribbean are we adopting and why? Some, as Roper, understand Caribbean theology as exilic theology, while others, like Devon Dick, see it as emancipation theology. More questions emerge. Is Caribbean theology in the tradition of Latin American liberation theologies? The opinions diverge. What is the relationship between Caribbean theology and Black theologies produced by the African diaspora elsewhere? What do we make of countries like Puerto Rico, which sits at the intersection of the Caribbean, Latin America, and the United States? How does the Caribbean diaspora in the United States relate to the theological priorities of the region when they have formed their own contextual theologies that respond to very different experiences? I have more questions than answers and I totally lack the presumption of having answers to them. Furthermore, I believe there needs to be space for organic redefinition as new voices join the theological dialogue, our contexts change, and deeper understandings of our individual, national, and regional identities are articulated. I believe that it is there in that organic space of redefinition and taking of the word that the future of a more indigenous Caribbean Christian theology is found, and with it my earthly home transformed.

[1] Adolfo Ham, “Caribbean Theology: The Challenge of the Twenty-First Century,” in Caribbean Theology: Preparing for the Challenges Ahead, Howard Gregory, ed. (Canoe Press, 1995), 3-4.

[2] Lewin L. Williams, Caribbean Theology (Peter Lang, 1994), 3.

[3] Agustina Luvis Núñez, “Teología Caribeña – TB081,” TeoBytes, published on February 19, 2018, https://www.facebook.com/TeoBytes/videos/1412446628878223

[4] This phrase comes from Burchnell Taylor’s lecture “Stepping Out of the Shadow of Empire,” delivered at the University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA, March 2004.

[5] Garnett Roper, “The Caribbean as the City of God,” in A Kairos Moment for Caribbean Theology: Ecumenical Voices in Dialogue, Garnett Roper and J. Richard Middleton, eds., (Eugene, Oregon: Pickwick Publications, 2013), 10.

[6] Ibid.

[7] Adolfo Ham, “The Challenge of the Twenty-First Century,” in Caribbean Theology: Preparing for the Challenges Ahead, Howard Gregory, ed., (Kingston, Jamaica: Canoe Press University of the West Indies, 1995), 3.

[8] See Gustavo Gutíerrez, “Liberación y desarrollo,” in Teología de la liberación, 18th ed., (Salamanca, Spain: Ediciones Sígueme, 2009), 73-92.

[9] Kathy McAfee quoted by Ham, “The Challenge of the Twenty-First Century,” 4.

[10] Ham, The Challenge of the Twenty-First Century,” 4.

[11] Gustavo Gutíerrez, A Theology of Liberation: History, Politics, and Salvation (Orbis Books; 15th Anniversary Edition, 1988), xxxiv.

[12] Emmette Weir quoted by Theresa Lowe-Ching, “Method in Caribbean Theology,” in Caribbean Theology: Preparing for the Challenges Ahead, Howard Gregory, ed., (Kingston, Jamaica: Canoe Press University of the West Indies, 1995), 25.

[13] Garnett Roper, “The Caribbean as the City of God,” 18.

[14] Ibid.

SPANISH VERSION

Introducción

Rara vez el Caribe ha sido considerada una región productora de conocimiento, especialmente cuando se trata de teología. Sus elaboraciones teológicas aún no han recibido la atención que otras teologías, frecuentemente denominadas “contextuales”, han recibido. Sin embargo, esto no significa que la reflexión teológica en palabra y hecho ha estado ausente en la región. De hecho, la historia ha sido testigo de cómo el Caribe continúa su travesía de teologías de imposición e imitación a teologías de indigenización, incluso cuando el proceso ha sido truncado por diversos factores.

Una región multilingüe, geográficamente fragmentada e insular, la realidad caribeña como la conocemos emergió de procesos de explotación imperial y colonial en sus formas más brutales. Esto incluyó el genocidio de sus poblaciones indígenas y la importación de una significativa población africana a través del comercio transatlántico de esclavos por poderes coloniales. Así que, hablar del Caribe y su gente es hablar del robo, imposición, y reformulación de la identidad en el contexto del colonialismo en sus versiones antiguas y nuevas, las cuales han perdurado hasta bien entrado el siglo 21. Es hablar acerca del legado social, cultural, político, psicológico, religioso y económico dejado por la empresa colonial y las teologías de dominación que bautizaron a esta empresa como la voluntad de [d]ios. Estas son las realidades que sirven no solo como trasfondo ante el cual las articulaciones teológicas son formuladas sino como el punto de partida del quehacer teológico.

Este ensayo no busca ser presuntuoso. No es posible condensar lo expansivo y la complejidad del Caribe y su rica pluralidad en un blog post o incluso en un libro. La meta de esta breve pieza es servir como iniciador de diálogos para aquellas personas que quizás nunca han oído acerca o no se han familiarizado con la teología cristiana caribeña, sus prioridades, fuentes, características, y voces.

Prioridades en el Caribe

En su ensayo “Caribbean Theology: The Challenge of the Twenty-First Century,” Adolfo Ham enlista cinco prioridades principales en el Caribe. Estas son descolonización, identidad, integración, desarrollo, y educación.[1]

  • Descolonización

El colonialismo y neo-colonialismo –el “control económico, social, y político ejercido por fuerzas exteriores, operando frecuentemente a través de la agencia de clases internas privilegiadas” [2]– son el denominador común en el contexto caribeño. Son el factor determinante que le da forma a todos los aspectos de la vida y el ser tanto a nivel colectivo como individual. En la región, la descolonización requiere más mera independencia política. Como señala la Dra. Agustina Luvis Núñez, “La descolonización tiene que ir tan profundo como ha ido la colonización. Requiere una conversión del corazón, una reorientación de la mente, la re-evaluación de los valores, la deconstrucción de estructuras opresivas, y la construcción de estructuras apropiadas.” [3]

  • Identidad

La situación de la identidad es compleja debido a los aspectos individuales, nacionales y regionales, y cómo estos han sido formados, deformados, y reformados en el contexto de imposición y dominación imperial. La identidad caribeña nació de la exterminación de sus poblaciones nativas, el secuestro y la importación de personas africanas esclavizadas, la migración de otras poblaciones, y la formación de sujetos coloniales y sus conciencias “a la sombra del imperio.” [4] Vale la pena citar aquí en detalle a Garnett Roper,

Además de ser valorados solo por su capacidad de imitar, las personas que viven a la sombra del imperio suelen ser invisibles. Su existencia no es clara y no tienen una identidad propiamente definida. No tienen rostro humano real ni sustancia. Por lo tanto, están abiertos a ser estampados con las imágenes económicas y étnicas estereotipadas elegidas por los intereses imperiales. Las cuestiones de tamaño geográfico, composición étnica/demográfica, prosperidad económica y ubicación estratégica se atribuyen a naciones y pueblos enteres como su único significado […] No tienen una identidad reconocida, salvo las que les sea convenientemente asignada; su importancia o falta de importancia está determinada por su valor en relación con los intereses imperiales. [5]

Roper argumenta que esto ha llevado a la gente caribeña a una “crisis de identidad perpetua,” en contra de la cual se levanta la voz de la teología caribeña “en protesta y en respuesta.” [6]

  • Integración

Como indica Ham, la lucha por la independencia en el Caribe siempre fue pensada por nuestros ancestros en el contexto de una región integrada que modelara una inter-dependencia justa.[7] Esta integración honraría las particularidades de la identidad de cada nación mientras que a la misma vez cultivaría una identidad regional.

  • Desarrollo

La calidad de vida ha sido algo elusivo a la gran mayoría de la población en el Caribe. Mucho del desarrollo que en un momento u otro se ha buscado ha fracasado en ser sostenible a múltiples niveles, poniendo a algunas de nuestras naciones en una mayor vulnerabilidad económica. Esto es lo que en América Latina se ha llamado desarrollismo – propuestas de desarrollo socio-económico que no atacan la raíz de los problemas y protegen los intereses de potencias mundiales.[8] Para Katy McAfee, el tipo de desarrollo necesario en el Caribe es uno que “redefina crecimiento; es ecológicamente, psicológicamente y socialmente sustentable; permite que las mujeres jueguen un rol central; rescate la cultura e identidad caribeñas; y empodere a la gente pobre en la región.”[9] Es un desarrollo integral.

  • Educación

Educación es la última área identificada por Ham como una de las principales prioridades en el Caribe. Él describe la misma como “una de las áreas en crisis.”[10] El presente status de la educación en el Caribe varía de nación a nación. Por ejemplo, en Puerto Rico, tenemos una crisis al nivel de K-12, debido particularmente a la corrupción gubernamental y el robo de fondos destinados a apoyar a nuestro sistema de educación pública. Simultáneamente, estamos viendo a la generación de profesionales jóvenes más preparada académicamente estar subempleados debido a la realidad socio-económica del archipiélago. Es común ver personas con maestrías y doctorados trabajando en posiciones de servicio que no requieren este tipo de cualificación. Ham destaca que esta prioridad está directamente relacionada a la educación teológica, la cual desde mi perspectiva se encuentra en un estado crítico en la región debido a varias razones, incluyendo la falta de fondos, la falta de oportunidades justamente remuneradas para aquellas personas entrenadas teológicamente, y la pobre administración de algunos seminarios.

A estas prioridades, Ashley Smith apropiadamente añade la de relaciones familiares y de género. Esto es de vital importancia en una región donde la violencia de género permea el día a día y va en aumento en un contexto de impunidad.

No debe sorprendernos que estas prioridades jueguen un rol central en cualquier elaboración teológica cristiana que aspire a ser considerada “caribeña.” Como escribe Gutíerrez, “La teología busca ser un leguaje sobre Dios. Se trata de una fe inseparable de las condiciones concretas en que vive la gran mayoría…”[11] En esta región, hacer teología divorciada de las realidades que la han marcado y la historia que la ha formado es estéril e infructuoso. Más aún, la meta de quehacer teológico cristiano no es simplemente articular ideas, sino que es la praxis (práctica) transformadora cimentada en el Evangelio del Dios de la vida y su reino – Un reino que contrasta fuertemente en oposición con los anti-reinos coloniales que han dado forma la vida en el Caribe; un Dios que afirma la dignidad y las identidades del pueblo caribeño; y un Evangelio que es buena noticia para la vida en esta vida y no solo para la vida después de la muerte. La descolonización, la formación y recuperación de la identidad, la integración, el desarrollo integral, y la educación son elementos clave para el florecimiento de las naciones que constituyen el Caribe. Que la teología caribeña descarte o ignore estas prioridades es descartar la promesa y la posibilidad del florecimiento humano para nuestra gente.

Las fuentes de la teología cristiana caribeña

Emmette Weir identifica cuatro fuentes primarias para la teología cristiana caribeña. Estas son el texto bíblico, la historia de la gente caribeña, la historia de la iglesia en el Caribe, y las declaraciones de cuerpos conciliares y ecuménicos en el Caribe.[12] Yo creo que hay congruencia entre estos y algunos elementos del llamado “Cuadrilátero wesleyano.” Por ejemplo, en ambos marcos la Escritura es la fuente más importante para la reflexión teológica. Asimismo, la teología caribeña mantiene los elementos de la tradición y la experiencia en la forma de la historia regional y las formulaciones conciliares y ecuménicas de la iglesia caribeña. Esta historia, aunque particular, no está desconectada de la historia de la iglesia universal. Para los teólogos y teólogas caribeños, la pregunta acerca de las fuentes para la reflexión teológica no es un caso de uno u otro sino de ambos. De esta manera tienen la oportunidad de hacer teología a la sombra de la iglesia universal y a la luz de su contexto.

El proyecto de la teología cristiana caribeña

Para Roper, la teología caribeña “se ha dado en matrimonio al proyecto histórico” del Caribe, cuya “preocupación no es solo la liberación de la opresión, sino un compromiso a la supervivencia de la gente.”[13] Él añade, “En este sentido, la teología caribeña busca aproximar al reino de Dios, el ideal escatológico de shalom, a la situación concreta del Caribe.”[14] Entonces, el proyecto de la teología cristiana caribeña es la transformación. Esto es, la transformación de las estructuras a nivel personal, nacional y regional que son perpetuadas por los reinos de este mundo que privan la vida y solo sirven para servirse a sí mismos. Esta transformación es posible por un quehacer teológico que en palabra y obra vive los valores del reino de Dios, y que está cimentado en un evangelio que es buenas nuevas para esta vida.

¿Qué es la teología cristiana caribeña?

Dada la pluralidad y complejidad de la región, ¿es posible contestar esta pregunta? ¿Quién tiene el poder de definirla? Más aún, ¿cuál definición del Caribe adoptamos y por qué? Algunos, como Roper, entienden la teología caribeña como teología del exilio, mientras otros, como Devon Dick, la ven como teología emancipatoria. Más preguntas surgen. ¿Está la teología caribeña en la misma tradición que las teologías de liberación latinoamericanas? Las opiniones divergen. ¿Cuál es la relación entre la teología caribeña y las teologías negras producidas por la diáspora africana en otras latitudes? ¿Qué hacemos con países como Puerto Rico, el cual se encuentra en la intersección del Caribe, América Latina, y los Estados Unidos? ¿Cómo la diáspora caribeña en los Estados Unidos se relaciona con las prioridades teológicas de la región cuando ellos y ellas han formulado sus propias teologías contextuales que responden a experiencias muy diferentes? Tengo más preguntas que respuestas. Y tampoco tengo la presunción de tener las respuestas a todas estas preguntas. Además, creo que se necesita un espacio orgánico para la redefinición de muchos de los aspectos mencionado, particularmente cuando tenemos nuevas voces uniéndose al diálogo, el cambio dinámico de nuestros contextos, y la articulación de entendimientos más profundos acerca de nuestras identidades individuales, nacionales, y regionales. Creo que es allí, en ese espacio orgánico de redefinición y del tomar la Palabra, que el futuro de una teología cristiana caribeña más propia se encuentra –y en ese futuro, mi hogar terrenal transformado.

[1] Adolfo Ham, “Caribbean Theology: The Challenge of the Twenty-First Century,” in Caribbean Theology: Preparing for the Challenges Ahead, Howard Gregory, ed. (Canoe Press, 1995), 3-4.

[2] Lewin L. Williams, Caribbean Theology (Peter Lang, 1994), 3.

[3] Agustina Luvis Núñez, “Teología Caribeña – TB081,” TeoBytes, published on February 19, 2018, https://www.facebook.com/TeoBytes/videos/1412446628878223

[4] This phrase comes from Burchnell Taylor’s lecture “Stepping Out of the Shadow of Empire,” delivered at the University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA, March 2004.

[5] Garnett Roper, “The Caribbean as the City of God,” in A Kairos Moment for Caribbean Theology: Ecumenical Voices in Dialogue, Garnett Roper and J. Richard Middleton, eds., (Eugene, Oregon: Pickwick Publications, 2013), 10.

[6] Ibid.

[7] Adolfo Ham, “The Challenge of the Twenty-First Century,” in Caribbean Theology: Preparing for the Challenges Ahead, Howard Gregory, ed., (Kingston, Jamaica: Canoe Press University of the West Indies, 1995), 3.

[8] See Gustavo Gutíerrez, “Liberación y desarrollo,” in Teología de la liberación, 18th ed., (Salamanca, Spain: Ediciones Sígueme, 2009), 73-92.

[9] Kathy McAfee quoted by Ham, “The Challenge of the Twenty-First Century,” 4.

[10] Ham, The Challenge of the Twenty-First Century,” 4.

[11] Gustavo Gutiérrez, Teología de la liberación: Perspectivas, 18va ed., (Salamanca, España: Ediciones Sígueme, 2009), 38-39.

[12] Emmette Weir quoted by Theresa Lowe-Ching, “Method in Caribbean Theology,” in Caribbean Theology: Preparing for the Challenges Ahead, Howard Gregory, ed., (Kingston, Jamaica: Canoe Press University of the West Indies, 1995), 25.

[13] Garnett Roper, “The Caribbean as the City of God,” 18.

[14] Ibid.

Juliany González Nieves is an Afro-Caribbean Puerto Rican evangélica woman born and raised on the island. She holds a Master of Divinity from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, IL, and a B.Sc. in Biology from the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras. Her main area of interest is Caribbean and Latin American theologies at the intersection of race, ethnicity, and gender across geographical and linguistic lines. Juliany is also founder-editor of The Mosaic Bulletin and is actively involved with The Paul G. Hiebert Center for World Christianity and Global Theology. You can visit her website Glocal Theology.

Photo by Max Böttinger on Unsplash

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.